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20130129
20130206
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clinton. >> funding "to t contrary" provided by... funding "to the contrary" provided by -- >> this week on "to the contrary," former secretary of state hillary clinton. >> women will yell. women try to human man nice human rights so i know it's penetrated the world culture. >> what would you say if you don't under up running for president? >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to the special edition of "to the contrary." this week an interview with former secretary of state hillary clinton. i sat down with her to talk about her incredible legacy for women and girls. >> you have changed the world for women and girls. where did your passion for this issue come from? >> i think it came from my childhood. it probably came from learning about the difficult childhood my mother had and how important it was f girls to be given the same opportunities as boys. i think it came from my own experience as a kind of tomboy, playing in the neighborhood and hearing every so often, well, you know, girls can't play. it probably was something that was really a part of the atmosphere that i
. >> brown: secretary of state hillary clinton logged nearly a million miles visiting more than 100 countries in the last four years. ray suareexanes her legacy. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a preview of sunday's big game. npr's mike pesca joins us from new orleans, site of super bowl xlvii. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporatn of n york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: for the second time in five months, a u.s. diplomatic post has been the target of a deadly assault. a suicide bomber detonated a vest with explosives outsi
tsukamoto, nhk world, seoul. >>> u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has urged north koa to give up on the idea of conducting another nuclear test. she made the appeal during a question and answer session with citizens and reporters around the world. she'll leave office on friday. clinton said she has been watching how kim jong un has developed as a leader. >> we expected him to focus on improving the lives of the north korean people, not just the elite but everyone, to have more education, more openness, more opportunity. and instead he has engaged in very provocative rhetoric and behavior. >> clinton said u.s. officials will work together with their allies to try to change that behavior. she underscored the importance of north korea's closest ally. >> we want to see a rising power like china join the international community as a responsible stakehold er, continue its extraordinary efforts to lift hundreds of millions of people out of poverty, create a strong vital middle class, have respectful relations with its neighbors in all of the ways on land and sea that that is required. >
for to this next chapter in my life. >> hillary clinton, outgoing secretary of state. but chapter would that be? >> i think it is the resurrection. this is someone who left the presidential campaign bruising and to see her potentially eight years later as the overwhelming front runner for the democratic nomination, is a remarkable comeback. >> john kerry approve for secretary of state. what are his greatest challenges? >> remaining consistent with the administration's policy. that he does not go out on his own to make his own policy. i do not see him performing the way hillary clinton performed. she was part of a team. he has wanted this job for so long. i think he will be a problem. >> i wonder if they are worried about hillary clinton. you see how great her presence has been, what a successful secretary of state she has been. any time some conservatives can, they want to take a knife to her throat, and she always turned back on them. she has emerged into an incredible force. i do not know what she does. i hope that it continues for her and us. >> her chapter is titled iowa and new hampshire.
, secretary clinton did, which mandated or agreed that there would be a political transition, that there would be opposition and government members of that transition and that the makeup would have to be mutually agreed to. of course it going to be mutually agreed to, you know the opposition would not have had assad going in this going forward that is where the breakdown of the russians has taken place. we continue to engage with them, meet with them regularly, we have not come to an agreement on a political way forward here. i hope we can do that. >> in the near term. >> well, i think the sooner the better as i said. now during the course of this year, the president will have the opportunity to meet with president putin on a number of occasions beginning this spring. >> but aren't you going to see putin soon wince i think i will visit russia in the next month. >> and see putin. >> yes. >> what do you want to come out of that and did you reset the relationship so that it's more likely that you can have, because if you have good big power understanding it gives you more leverage to deal with th
years. he will succeed hillary clinton, who is stepping down after serving as secretary of state since 2009. in egypt, the army chief warned the country's political crisis could lead to the "collapse" of the state. general abdel-fattah el-sisi issued the warning as protests and violence extended into a sixth day. in port said, thousands of people marched in funerals for some of the 60 people killed since last week. and in cairo, groups of protters fought again with riot police. the protests are aimed at president mohamed morsi and his islamist-dominated government. evidence of a new massacre surfaced in syria today. at least 65 bodies were found in aleppo. the victims had been bound and shot in the head, but it was unclear who was responsible. meanwhile, the plight of thousands of refugees continued to worsen. some have even sought shelter in ancient ruins at serjilla, in northwestern syria. john irvine of independent television news reports. >> three weeks old. reporter: and what a world she's been born into. for her hom is a hole in the ground. it was dug by the romans who used it to
the world more than you do. maybe bill clinton. >> yeah, the clintons. >> rose: the clintons, exactly. does the world still look on the united states as the place that they'd like to see offer real global leadership? >> absolutely. it's-- it's almost daunting because they really do expect to us get our act together, and whether it's global security, global invention, doing governance right, they look to the united states. >> rose: and what do they expect from us? >> they expe to us get our -- rose: by example as well as need. >> absolute. they expect, whether it's towfd disease, whether it's how you take care of your people as they get older. how you do education. how you keep driving innovation, how you deal with climate change, they actually expect the united states to take the lead. you know, as much as china is growing, nobody looks to them as a primary role model. . >> rose: because they see the things they do that are not very attractive or because there are so many possibilities of social tension within a country that large? >> ironically it's partly because china is so inward lookin
ally in the arab world, secretary clinton said it's part of the solution, not part of the problem. >> right. >> it has really acquired a tremendous amount of respect. but people will be able to judge for themselves. >> rose: i will ask these questions because i want to gets some of them in. here is an obvious question but and that we should ask. is nuclear energy such as coal, fusion a true solution toned our dependence on fossil fuel and help curb global warming? >> well, it is certainly not a silver bullet it may play a limited role in the future. the present generation of nuclear technology is way too expeive. if you run a utility and you decide to build a new nuclear power plant, you go to your engineers or you go to any engineering consulting firm in the world and ask,okay, how much will this cost. they will say to you we really have no idea. >> right. >> then ask you them how long will it take to build it. and they'll say we don't know. >> and those are serious problems if you are trying to build a power plant. and that's really why the industry has declined. to state the is
he was a crony of robert rubin. >> jack lew served in the clinton administration. i think he worked in the omb in the, you know, office of management of the budget. and he was one of the key players in helping pass the repeal of glass-steagall. and, you know, this is kind of the way it works. it's not a one to one, you know, obvious connection. but, you know, glass-steagall was repealed specifically to legalize the merger of citigroup. and, you know, coincidentally bob rubin, who was the treasury secretary and jack lew end up working at citroup five,en ars ter. d th make enormous amounts of money. and then they go back to government. and again, this is just sort of this merry-go-round that everybody in washington knows about. and that's the way it works. >> how do you explain president obama's attitude in this? when he was running for president, he promised the close the revolving door. and he seemed genuinely shocked at the collapse of the financial system and the banks' role in it. but he also was raking in massive campaign contributions from these very people. did those investmen
with president clinton. being in situations and kind of going with an idea in mind and having a real world just watch over you and take your idea out, so refreshing especially for somebody in the middle of their live, it was really eye opening and i think a lot of of the kind of more positive qualities here are a effect of those getting out in the world and writing those stories. >> rose: you also stated at some point you started about the idea i was talking about earlier you said the absence of wealth was the erosion of grace. meaning? >> i'll tell you the exaggerated version. i worked at a slaughterhouse in my 20's, young guy pretty healthy kind of a positive thinker. and just worked eight or ten hours as a knuckle it was called. and so there in the prime of my life i had come home, couldn't open my hands because there was a hook and a knife and i was 26 year old running them under hot water. i noticed with a little bit of shock at night i didn't want to do anything. i didn't want to go out, i didn't want to watch tv. if i could work up the nerve i had a beer meeting but the whole thing was
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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